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The_grounds_of_the_palace_of_Farhat_Baksh_in_Lucknow_lit_by_innumerable_coloured_lamps_-_B

FOR ALL WITH AN INTEREST IN THE HISTORY 

OF THE EAST INDIA COMPANY AND THE BRITISH RAJ

LIVE LECTURES

The Indian Mutiny

In 2024 The British in India will present two live lectures on the Indian Mutiny from 6:30pm to 8pm on Monday 10 June and Monday 14 October at University Women's Club, 2 Audley Square, Mayfair, London W1K 1DB. Lectures will be presented in the Library and preceded by drinks in the Drawing Room from 5:30pm. For those who would like to stay, an optional two-course meal (main course, dessert and coffee) from 8pm to 9:30pm will follow in the Drawing Room. Tickets for the lecture cost £20 and for the lecture and meal £58.50. Drinks can be purchased separately from the pay bar in the Drawing Room before and after the lecture.

HOW TO BOOK

How to book

Tickets may be booked online by card through Eventbrite (platform fees apply) or by cheque or bank transfer. See below.

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YALE CENTER FOR BRITISH ART / BROWN UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

MONDAY 10 JUNE 2024 18.30-20.00 

The Rise and Fall of the City of Lucknow

Rosie Llewellyn-Jones

 

Lucknow enjoyed a short but spectacular rise after the Nawabs of Avadh made it their capital in 1775. Celebrated as a city of palaces, shrines and extraordinary European-inspired architecture, the arts of dance, music, drama, poetry, painting and silverware flourished under its fabulously wealthy rulers. This cultural splendour ended when the East India Company annexed Avadh and the Indian Mutiny broke out. The city was occupied by rebel sepoys and Lucknow became famed throughout the Empire for the defence of the British Residency by its small garrison of soldiers, civilians and schoolboys, its reliefs by Havelock and Outram and its eventual fall to the British in fierce fighting.

 

Dr Rosie Llewellyn-Jones MBE is a renowned historian of colonial India who has lectured widely in Britain, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, France and the USA. Her many books include Lucknow 1857, The Last King in India: Wajid Ali Shah, The Uprising of 1857, A Fatal Friendship: The Nawabs, the British and the City of Lucknow and, most recently, Empire Building: The Construction of British India, 1690-1860. 

AT University Women's Club, 2 Audley Square, Mayfair, London W1K 1DB

The lecture will be will be presented in the Library and preceded by drinks in the Drawing Room from 5:30pm. For those who would like to stay, an optional two-course meal (main course, dessert and coffee) from 8pm to 9:30pm will follow in the Drawing Room. Tickets for the lecture cost £20 and for the lecture and meal £58.50. Drinks can be purchased separately from the pay bar in the Drawing Room before and after the lecture. Dietary requirements accommodated where notified to info@britishinindia.org.uk

This price includes Eventbrite's platform fees.

This price includes Eventbrite's platform fees.

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ALAMY / NATIONAL ARMY MUSEUM

MONDAY 14 OCTOBER 2024 18.30-20.00 

Onward, Christian Soldier: Havelock's March to Cawnpore and Lucknow

Sir Mark Havelock-Allan KC

SAVE THE DATE

The grounds of the palace of Farhat Baksh in Lucknow lit by innumerable coloured lamps (detail). Watercolour of Farhat Baksh in Lucknow from Views by Seeta Ram from Cawnpore to Mohumdy vol. IV produced for Lord Moira, afterwards the Marquess of Hastings, by Sita Ram between 1814 and 1815. British Library, CC0. Farhat Baksh, originally named the Château de Lyon, was designed and built in 1781 on the banks of the Gomti river by Frenchman Claude Martin as his city residence in Lucknow. After Martin’s death it was acquired by Nawab Saadat Ali Khan, who renamed it Farhat Baksh and transformed it into a palace. 

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