For all with an interest in the history

OF THE East India Company and the British Raj

The British in India Historical Trust presents Zoom lectures by authors of recently published books of interest to descendants of the British who lived and worked in South Asia between 1600 and 1947 and all who want to know more about the period. From 2022 we shall promote scholarship by organising annual essay and book prizes for excellence in non-fiction historical writing on the British in South Asia. 

FORTHCOMING

 

Tuesday 16 November 6.30-8pm GMT (Zoom)

India in the Persianate Age

Richard M. Eaton with Rosie Llewellyn-Jones

Richard Eaton recounts how population movements into India from Iran and Central Asia introduced Persian culture, how it is reflected in language, literature, cuisine, attire, religion, art, architecture and more, and how its interaction with India’s Sanskrit culture shaped the Delhi Sultanate, the Mughal Empire and regional states. Rosie Llewellyn-Jones explores how the British in the 18th century responded to this cultural milieu.

 

Richard M. Eaton is the author of  India in the Persianate Age 1000-1765 (Penguin 2020). He is Professor of History at the University of Arizona. Rosie Llewellyn-Jones’s  many books on British India include The Last King in India: Wajid Ali Shah (Hurst).

 

>>BOOK NOW<<  via Eventbrite for this lecture only

 

>>BOOK NOW<< via Eventbrite for all five lectures (This link leads to the booking page for 'Ruling the Savage Periphery'. The 'all five lectures' ticket is listed there.)

 

Tuesday 14 December 6.30-8pm GMT (Zoom)

Wellington and the British Army’s Indian Campaigns 1798-1805

Martin R. Howard

The Indian theatre of the Napoleonic Wars has been neglected. It was a brutal conflict in which British armies made up of King’s regiments and native and European troops of the East India Company clashed with the forces of Mysore and the Maratha princes. There were dramatic pitched battles at Assaye, Argaum, Delhi and Laswari, and epic sieges at Seringapatam, Gawilghur and Bhurtpore. British success was not universal.

 

Martin R. Howard is the author of   Wellington and the British Army’s Indian Campaigns 1798-1805 (Pen & Sword 2020) and several others on the Napoleonic Wars. He is a Consultant Haematologist and a Visiting Professor at the University of York.

 

>>BOOK NOW<<  via Eventbrite for this lecture only

 

>>BOOK NOW<< via Eventbrite for all five lectures (This link leads to the booking page for 'Ruling the Savage Periphery'. The 'all five lectures' ticket is listed there.)

 

 

Tuesday 18 January 6.30-8pm GMT (Zoom)

The Estate of Major-General Claude Martin at Lucknow

Rosie Llewellyn-Jones

This talk offers a unique glimpse into a European household in 18th-century India. Major-General Claude Martin was a French soldier who joined the East India Company after the French lost Pondicherry. He became not only the richest European of his day but a purveyor of Enlightenment ideas. Martin’s biographer discusses his paintings, silverware, jewellery, armoury, scientific equipment and more, and his large library, based on the inventory of his possessions and the examinations of six experts.

 

Rosie Llewellyn-Jones MBE is the editor of  The Estate of Major-General Claude Martin at Lucknow: An Indian Inventory (Cambridge Scholars 2021), her third book on Martin.

 

>>BOOK NOW<<  via Eventbrite for this lecture only

 

>>BOOK NOW<< via Eventbrite for all five lectures (This link leads to the booking page for 'Ruling the Savage Periphery'. The 'all five lectures' ticket is listed there.)

 

Wednesday 16 February 6.30-8pm GMT (Zoom)

Peace, Poverty and Betrayal: A New History of British India

Roderick Matthews

How can we explain Britain’s long rule in India? Not by ‘divide and rule’ but ‘oblige and rule’: common purpose between colonisers and powerful Indians. British policy was never consistent. After siding with progressive elements, the East India Company evolved into arguably the world’s first liberal government. Coalition post-1858 with the landed elite, underinvestment and prioritising British interests impoverished India and left it divided.

 

Roderick Matthews is the author of  Peace, Poverty and Betrayal: A New History of British India (Hurst 2021) and several other works on Indian politics.

 

>>BOOK NOW<<  via Eventbrite for this lecture only

 

>>BOOK NOW<< via Eventbrite for all five lectures (This link leads to the booking page for 'Ruling the Savage Periphery'. The 'all five lectures' ticket is listed there.)

 

 

Tuesday 15 March 6.30-8pm GMT (Zoom)

Ruling the Savage Periphery

Benjamin D. Hopkins

This talk considers how the system of frontier rule developed by Robert Sandeman, head of the Baluchistan Agency, to govern the unruly tribes of the Afghan frontier was exported to Mesopotamia, Palestine, Nigeria and elsewhere in the Empire. Similar systems were developed in the US and Argentina, and Ben Hopkins explores how they were used by expanding empires to control and subjugate peoples on the periphery.

 

Benjamin D. Hopkins is the author of  Ruling the Savage Periphery: Frontier Governance and the Making of the Modern State (Harvard University Press 2020).  He is Professor of History and International Relations at George Washington University.

 

>>BOOK NOW<<  via Eventbrite for this lecture only

 

>>BOOK NOW<< via Eventbrite for all five lectures (This link leads to the booking page for 'Ruling the Savage Periphery'. The 'all five lectures' ticket is listed there.)

 

Time/price

6.30-8pm UK time (Zoom)

£5.00 per lecture

book discounts available to attendees

 

Proceeds help fund prizes for non-fiction historical writing on British India

 

 

PAST

 

Tuesday 19 October 6.30-8pm BST (Zoom)

The Origins of the British Empire in Asia

David Veevers